Ingredient Spotlight

I Say ‘Aloe,' You Say ‘Vera'

5 minute read

Aloe is one of the most versatile plants to grace us. It's found in hot, dry climates like Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, and California. Or, you can find aloe plants in many people's apartment plant collections.

While its cactus-like appearance is spikey and tough, what matters is what's on the inside, right?

The inside of an aloe plant consists of a gel-like texture and is water-dense. Often, people cultivate aloe to create a refreshing beverage, food products (like for boba), and topical application.

In this article we'll be discussing the topical usage of aloe vera!

What are the Benefits?

The inside of an aloe plant consists of a gel-like texture and is water-dense. Often, people cultivate aloe to create a refreshing beverage, food products (like for boba), and topical application because aloe is highly anti-inflammatory. Let's see what else aloe vera is good for!

  • Burns and wounds: Aloe gel heals burns, like sunburns and minor wounds.
  • Acne: According to research, when aloe gel is applied in the morning and evening in addition to prescription acne medicine tretinoin, it may increase acne reduction.
  • Psoriasis: Aloe extract cream might reduce redness, scaling, itching, and inflammation caused by mild to moderate psoriasis.

Furthermore, aloe contains antioxidants, enzymes, Vitamins A and C. It also has aloin, a non-toxic compound that reduces hyperpigmentation caused by acne or another scarring. According to a study submitted to the Indian Journal of Dermatology:

Aloe gel not only increased collagen content of the wound but also changed collagen composition and increased the degree of collagen cross linking. Due to this, it accelerated wound contraction and increased the breaking strength of resulting scar tissue.

Aloe vera is recommended for those with oily and combination skin since it won't clog pores. Curious to know how aloe vera is used? Keep reading to learn about five DIY aloe mask recipes!

How to Use Aloe Vera?

For skin care, aloe vera is used as a component in moisturizers. For many noncomedogenic and oil-free moisturizers, aloe is one of the primary ingredients. Otherwise, applying fresh aloe from the plant is common, too! You can sometimes find aloe vera leaves at your grocery store. Cut the aloe in half and rub the gel on your skin.

If you like do-it-yourself projects, mindbodygreen has collection of easy aloe vera face mask recipes.

  • Aloe vera and honey
  • Aloe vera and apple cider vinegar
  • Aloe and turmeric
  • Aloe and coconut oil
  • Aloe vera and yogurt

Personally, I use aloe vera gel when I notice my scalp is drier than usual in the wintertime. In the summer, I like to use aloe on my legs and arms as a moisturizer because it leaves me feeling super refreshed!

Recommendations

So if you can't find aloe vera in your grocery store or want to use it besides after sunburns, check out some of our curated products with aloe vera as its main ingredient!

Benton Aloe Propolis Soothing Gel, $19

Key Ingredients: Aloe Leaf Juice, Propolis Extract

Herbivore After Sun Soothing Aloe Mist, $20

Key Ingredients: Aloe Water, Witch Hazel, Radish Root Ferment Filtrate, Lavender Oil, Spearmint Leaf Oil

Fat and the Moon Aloe Lotion, $16

Key Ingredients: Aloe Vera, Sunflower Oil, Coconut Oil, Beeswax, Elderberry Extract

Mill Creek Botanicals 99% Aloe Vera Gel, $6.99

Key Ingredients: Aloe Vera Gel, Cucumber Extract, Organic Comfrey Extract

The Green Beaver Company Sensitive Aloe Natural Day Cream, $24.49

Key Ingredients: Aloe Vera, Sunflower Seed Oil, Olive Oil, Green Tea Extract